My novel The Sea-God at Sunrise made it to the Quarter-Finals in the 2013 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards!!! I honestly did not expect to get this far. o.O I’m so excited.

My novel The Sea-God at Sunrise made it to the Quarter-Finals in the 2013 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards!!! I honestly did not expect to get this far. o.O I’m so excited.


sail-into-the-unknown:

Now she is a fine vessel, how I would like to sail the seas on her!

sail-into-the-unknown:

Now she is a fine vessel, how I would like to sail the seas on her!

(via gonesailingtoo)


avanti011:


spiffingsailor:



amiablydebauchedsloth:




captainsaku:




boatporn:






capngrimbeard:






Not all Frigates have t’ have a mess o’ gundecks






Yah okay this is a whaleship, not a frigate at all.






Sorry to pop your bubble bro, but frigate is a term that refers to the disposition of the sails and masts (ie rigging). So technically, since the ship has a main, a mizzen and a foremast with square sails, referring to it as a frigate is in fact correct.




shit age of sail drama




A ship that has three masts and squares on each is a full-rigged ship. A frigate is a class of warship. Frigates could be full-rigged ships, but so could many other types of ships.
The ship in the picture is a whaler as well as a full-rigged ship.



Just for the record (from someone who has worked in the traditional maritime industry) this is absolutely a whale ship. The people commenting on the rigging are not necessarily incorrect, but this particular ship was a whaler. Also, check Google people! There is a long standing history of the NIGER as a whaling ship. Not everything has to do with rigging. Happy to see a discussion about traditional sail though!


Haha, this is indeed the Whaleship Niger of New Bedford. It seems my original commentary on this photo was deleted. For future reference:
"Gorgeous photo of the whaleship Niger of New Bedford, built in 1844. You can clearly see her fake gunports from the port (larboard) side. Most whaleships had these painted on with black and white paint to discourage pirates - the thinking was that the pirates would mistake the ships for naval vessels. Of course, once the pirates got close enough to see the whaleboats hanging from the davits, it would be clear that this was no armed frigate.

Scan from Albert Cook Church’s Whale Ships and Whaling.”
There are several signs that a ship is a whaleship. 1: a really bluff (square-shaped) bow and 2. multiple boats hanging from heavy-duty davit arms from both sides of the ship. Whaleships were the oil tankers of their day; they were not built for beauty or speed, but for hauling oil.

avanti011:

spiffingsailor:

amiablydebauchedsloth:

captainsaku:

boatporn:

capngrimbeard:


Not all Frigates have t’ have a mess o’ gundecks

Yah okay this is a whaleship, not a frigate at all.

Sorry to pop your bubble bro, but frigate is a term that refers to the disposition of the sails and masts (ie rigging). So technically, since the ship has a main, a mizzen and a foremast with square sails, referring to it as a frigate is in fact correct.

shit age of sail drama

A ship that has three masts and squares on each is a full-rigged ship. A frigate is a class of warship. Frigates could be full-rigged ships, but so could many other types of ships.

The ship in the picture is a whaler as well as a full-rigged ship.

Just for the record (from someone who has worked in the traditional maritime industry) this is absolutely a whale ship. The people commenting on the rigging are not necessarily incorrect, but this particular ship was a whaler. Also, check Google people! There is a long standing history of the NIGER as a whaling ship. Not everything has to do with rigging. Happy to see a discussion about traditional sail though!

Haha, this is indeed the Whaleship Niger of New Bedford. It seems my original commentary on this photo was deleted. For future reference:

"Gorgeous photo of the whaleship Niger of New Bedford, built in 1844. You can clearly see her fake gunports from the port (larboard) side. Most whaleships had these painted on with black and white paint to discourage pirates - the thinking was that the pirates would mistake the ships for naval vessels. Of course, once the pirates got close enough to see the whaleboats hanging from the davits, it would be clear that this was no armed frigate.

Scan from Albert Cook Church’s Whale Ships and Whaling.”

There are several signs that a ship is a whaleship. 1: a really bluff (square-shaped) bow and 2. multiple boats hanging from heavy-duty davit arms from both sides of the ship. Whaleships were the oil tankers of their day; they were not built for beauty or speed, but for hauling oil.


themindscanvas:

trem-das-cores:

America’s Cup

Oh. My.  Lovely.  Snap.

themindscanvas:

trem-das-cores:

America’s Cup

Oh. My.  Lovely.  Snap.

(via gonesailingtoo)


Highlights, part 1, from the 17th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon, New Bedford Whaling Museum, Massachusetts. I live tweeted the whole 25 hours with photos taken on instagram, as I didn’t bring my camera with me. I couldn’t have done this before this year, as I only got a smartphone in March of 2012, so MDM17 was an interesting intersection of 21st century technology and mid 1800s vocabulary that managed to trip up even the most limber-tongued of readers (don’t think I heard anyone who didn’t stumble at least once XD)

The reading started at 12 noon with retired Rep Barney Frank reading as Ishmael. We crossed the street to the historic Seamen’s Bethel for chapters 7-9 to hear Father Mapple read his famous sermon from the bow-shaped pulpit (which didn’t exist until they decided to film one of the Moby-Dick movies in New Bedford and decided to build one).

Back to the museum, I relaxed with some snacks while listening to chapters 10-24 from the floor of the Jacobs Family Gallery. A canvas backdrop with Richard Ellis’s painting of from the upstairs Bourne Building had been set up behind the reading podiums. We got to hear someone read aloud from the Braille version of Moby-Dick, which was awesome. Of course my trusty plush whale was there for the ride. You’ll see him featured in my photos throughout the weekend :P

To be continued because Tumblr doesn’t let me post more than 10 images at a time.


Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee. Sink all coffins and all hearses to one common pool! and since neither can be mine, let me then tow to pieces, while still chasing thee, though tied to thee, thou damned whale! Thus, I give up the spear!

Herman Melville, Moby-Dick


I just spent a wonderful weekend with the awesome people at the New Bedford Whaling Museum for their 17th annual Moby-Dick Marathon. It’s a 25 hour continuous reading, which means that at some point, usually around 1 AM or so, people start claiming their little corner of museum floor and snoring on it. If you’ve never spent the night in a museum, or read Moby-Dick all the way through without stopping, or both, I highly recommend it. Really.

I live-tweeted the whole thing and plan to put all the photos I took of the affair up on tumblr tomorrow. In the mean time, you can see all the tweets from the event at #mdm17 on Twitter.


boatporn:

These Spirit boats are lush.

boatporn:

These Spirit boats are lush.

(via boatporn)


Sperm whale encounter, shot off the coast of Dominica.


It is not down on any map; true places never are.
Herman Melville, Moby Dick (via yeaimthatdude)

annaboolio:

NIIIIIIIIIICE

annaboolio:

NIIIIIIIIIICE